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Creative Support - Jarrow Service, Jarrow.

Creative Support - Jarrow Service in Jarrow is a Supported living specialising in the provision of services relating to caring for adults over 65 yrs, caring for adults under 65 yrs, learning disabilities, personal care, physical disabilities and sensory impairments. The last inspection date here was 20th December 2017

Creative Support - Jarrow Service is managed by Creative Support Limited who are also responsible for 112 other locations

Contact Details:

Ratings:

For a guide to the ratings, click here.

Safe: Good
Effective: Good
Caring: Good
Responsive: Good
Well-Led: Good
Overall: Good

Further Details:

Service Provider:

    Creative Support Limited

This provider also manages:

Important Dates:

    Last Inspection 2017-12-20
    Last Published 2017-12-20

Local Authority:

    South Tyneside

Link to this page:

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Inspection Reports:

Click the title bar on any of the report introductions below to read the full entry. If there is a PDF icon, click it to download the full report.

27th October 2017 - During a routine inspection pdf icon

This inspection took place on 27, 31 October and 3 November 2017 and was announced. The provider was given 48 hours’ notice because the service is small and we needed to be sure that someone would be in. Creative Support – Jarrow provides an independent supported living service to adults with learning disabilities.

This service provides care and support to people living in a six ‘supported living’ settings, so that they can live as independently as possible. People’s care and housing needs are provided under separate contractual agreements. CQC does not regulate premises used for supported living; this inspection looked at people’s personal care and support.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The service also had a dedicated manager on site.

At the last inspection in August 2015, the service was rated ‘Good’. At this inspection we found the service remained ‘Good’.

Relatives we spoke with told us they were happy with the support and care their relative received. Sufficient appropriately trained staff were employed to meet people’s needs. People received a continuity of care with the same support workers. Staff were knowledgeable about the people they supported and interests important to them.

People were protected from abuse and harm. Staff had completed safeguarding training and were confident in identifying the signs of abuse and what action to take to keep people safe. A robust recruitment and selection process was in place. Medicines were managed safely. Procedures were in place to deal with emergency situations.

The service was responsive to people’s individual needs and preferences, enabling people to live a full life. Relatives and people were involved in the planning of their care. Information was provided in easy read format to assist people in understanding the care available to them.

People had maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

Activities were arranged for people who used the service based on their likes and interests and to help meet their social needs. People were supported to maintain good health and had access to healthcare professionals.

People and relatives told us staff were kind and caring. People were encouraged to be as independent as they wished.

Staff supported people to achieve their set objectives. Care plans gave clear information for staff to make sure each person’s specific needs were met.

Staff told us they were supported by the registered manager and manager. The provider carried out a range of quality assurance checks to monitor, identify and manage the quality of care provided.

5th August 2015 - During a routine inspection pdf icon

The inspection took place on 5 August 2015. This was the first time the service has been inspected.

Creative Support – Jarrow provides an independent supported living service to adults with learning disabilities.

The service comprises of six semi-detached bungalows, where people are assisted to live in the community. The service can accommodate up to six people, at the time of our inspection there were six people using the service.

A new manager was in place at the time of our inspection. The manager was aware of their responsibility to apply to become a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Family members told us their relatives were safe. One family member said, “Staff look after [my relative] well. They are happy.” Another said, “Everything is planned, staff keep [my relative] safe.”

People using the service and their families were involved in the recruitment process. All staff had completed a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check. We also saw the provider carried out reference checking in line with their recruitment policy.

Staff we spoke to had a good understanding of safeguarding adults. We saw any concerns were investigated and the appropriate authorities were informed.

Risk assessments were specific to the person and identified the risk and the actions needed to be taken to keep the person safe. We noted these were reviewed every six months or before if required.

Medicines were administered safely and records related to medicines were accurately completed.

We saw personal emergency evacuation plans (PEEPS) were present in people’s care records. They gave staff clear directions on actions to take in the event of a fire, including an identification of hazards and escape routes.

Staff members we spoke to told us they had received training in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and they were confident in supporting people who did not have capacity.

There were systems in place for handling and resolving complaints. Family members were aware of how to raise any concerns they may have.

Care plans were person centred and contained appropriate risk assessments. They were regularly reviewed and amended as necessary to ensure they reflected people’s changing support needs.

People had regular access to external health and social care professionals as they were required.

Staff were visible and the atmosphere was happy and calm. All activities and chats involved the people who used the service. We saw staff gave people their full attention throughout the whole day.

The provider had a clear philosophy to promote rights, independence, choice, inclusion, social opportunities, meaningful activities and relationships.

Staff were caring and treated people respectfully making sure their dignity was maintained.

People were involved in planning their own individual activities. We saw in one person’s home a board with pictures indicating activities or tasks for the week.

Quality assurance systems were in place and audits were carried out regularly to monitor the delivery of the service.

 

 

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