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Creative Support - Leeds Service (Brandling Court), Leeds.

Creative Support - Leeds Service (Brandling Court) in Leeds is a Homecare agencies and Supported living specialising in the provision of services relating to learning disabilities, mental health conditions and personal care. The last inspection date here was 19th September 2018

Creative Support - Leeds Service (Brandling Court) is managed by Creative Support Limited who are also responsible for 112 other locations

Contact Details:

    Address:
      Creative Support - Leeds Service (Brandling Court)
      3 Brandling Court
      Leeds
      LS10 3TQ
      United Kingdom
    Telephone:
      01132713246
    Website:

Ratings:

For a guide to the ratings, click here.

Safe: Good
Effective: Good
Caring: Good
Responsive: Good
Well-Led: Good
Overall: Good

Further Details:

Service Provider:

    Creative Support Limited

This provider also manages:

Important Dates:

    Last Inspection 2018-09-19
    Last Published 2018-09-19

Local Authority:

    Leeds

Link to this page:

    HTML   BBCode

Inspection Reports:

Click the title bar on any of the report introductions below to read the full entry. If there is a PDF icon, click it to download the full report.

14th August 2018 - During a routine inspection pdf icon

This inspection took place on 14, 17 and 20 August 2018 and was unannounced. This meant the staff and provider did not know we would be visiting.

Creative Support – Leeds Service (Brandling Court) provides personal care to people with a primary need associated with autism. The service provides support to up to 17 people living as tenants within four separate houses in the Brandling Court housing complex. At the time of our inspection visit there were 15 people using the service.

The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with CQC to manage the service. Like providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We last inspected the service in January 2016 and rated the service as ‘Good’. At this inspection we found the service remained ‘Good’ and met all the fundamental standards we inspected against.

Accidents and incidents were appropriately recorded and risk assessments were in place. The registered manager understood their responsibilities with regard to safeguarding and staff had been trained in safeguarding vulnerable adults.

Appropriate arrangements were in place for the safe administration and storage of medicines.

The home was clean, spacious and suitable for the people who used the service, and appropriate health and safety checks had been carried out.

There were sufficient numbers of staff on duty in order to meet the needs of people who used the service. The provider had an effective recruitment and selection procedure in place and carried out relevant vetting checks when they employed staff. Staff were suitably trained and received regular supervisions and appraisals.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives, and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. The policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were protected from the risk of poor nutrition and staff were aware of people’s nutritional needs.

Staff treated people with dignity and respect and helped to maintain people’s independence by encouraging them to care for themselves where possible. Support plans were in place that recorded people’s plans and wishes for their end of life care.

Care records showed that people’s needs were assessed before they started using the service and support plans were written in a person-centred way. Person-centred means ensuring the person is at the centre of any care or support plans and their individual wishes, needs and choices are taken into account.

Activities were arranged for people who used the service based on their likes and interests and to help meet their social needs.

The provider had an effective complaints procedure in place and people who used the service and family members were aware of how to make a complaint.

The provider had an effective quality assurance process in place. Staff said they felt supported by the management team. People who used the service, family members and staff were regularly consulted about the quality of the service via meetings and surveys.

26th January 2016 - During a routine inspection pdf icon

The inspection took place on 26 January 2016 and was unannounced. We carried out an inspection in April 2014, where we found the provider was meeting all the regulations we inspected.

Creative Support - Leeds Service provides personal care to people with a primary need associated with autism, living within the Brandling Court housing complex. The service provides support to up to 17 people offering 24 hour support. This care is provided in four separate houses.

At the time of the inspection there was a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We found people were cared for, or supported by, sufficient numbers of suitably qualified and experienced staff. Robust recruitment procedures were in place to make sure suitable staff worked with people who used the service and staff completed an induction when they started work. Staff received the training and support required to meet people’s needs.

People told us they felt safe in the home and we saw there were systems and processes in place to protect people from the risk of harm. Staff had a good understanding of safeguarding vulnerable adults and knew what to do to keep people safe. People were protected against the risks associated with medicines because the provider had appropriate arrangements in place to manage medicines safely.

People told us they got the support they needed with meals and healthcare. There was opportunity for people to be involved in a range of activities within the home or the local community.

The care and support plans we looked at contained appropriate mental capacity assessments. At the time of our inspection no applications for a Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards were required. People’s care and support needs were assessed and care and support plans identified how care and support should be delivered. People we spoke with told us they were very happy with the service they received and staff were kind and caring, treated them with dignity and respected their choices.

The service had good management and leadership. People had opportunity to comment on the quality of service and influence service delivery. Effective systems were in place which ensured people received safe quality care. Complaints were welcomed and were investigated and responded to appropriately.

7th April 2014 - During a routine inspection pdf icon

This inspection considered our five questions; Is the service caring? Is the service responsive? Is the service safe? Is the service effective? Is the service well led?

Below is a summary of what we found. The summary is based on our observations during the inspection, speaking with people using the service, their relatives, the staff supporting them and from looking at records.

If you want to see the evidence supporting our summary please read the full report.

Is the service safe?

The provider monitored the environment where support was provided to ensure issues were raised with the landlord on behalf of people who used the service. People who used the service and staff members told us there were always enough staff on duty to safely meet people’s needs. In addition to a duty manager on duty at all times the provider had a 24 hour support line for staff should they require support from a more senior manager.

Staff personnel records contained all the information required by the Health and Social Care Act. Where we found a staff member’s record of their eligibility to work was out of date the provider forwarded an up to date version. This showed that staff employed to work at the home were suitable and had the necessary skills and experience.

Is the service effective?

People told us they were happy with the care they received and their needs had been met. From speaking with staff it was evident they had a good knowledge of the people they supported. One person told us, “When I came here I had nothing. I have been to college, got NVQs (qualifications), and I am ready to move on.”

Is the service caring?

People were supported by kind and attentive staff who knew them well and spoke positively about people as individuals. Care records showed people were cared for using person centred approaches. Staff told us how they ensured the care they provided was appropriate to the person and helped them achieve greater independence. Staff were very knowledgeable about people’s needs associated with autism and how people could be supported to lead fulfilling lives.

Is the service responsive?

People’s needs were assessed before they were provided with support by the service. People met with key workers on a monthly basis to review their care. Records confirmed people’s preferences, interests, strengths, aspirations and diverse needs. People had access to activities that were important to them and were supported to try new experiences in the community?

Is the service well-led?

Staff had a good understanding of the ethos of the service and quality assurance processes were in place. People told us they felt involved in the running of the service and felt their opinions mattered. Staff were clear about their roles and responsibilities. Records showed the management team worked with all staff and people who used the service to maintain standards and secure improvement.

 

 

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